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wallup.net

Here’s another sneak peek of my upcoming YA fantasy novel, Everdream.  Kynan has just entered the Dragon’s vale, seeing for the first time just how much damage a dragon can do.  Please let me know what you think in the comments.

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In my upcoming Young Adult Fantasy novel Everdream, one of the most important characters spends the whole book sleeping.

Queen Aderyn, young Prince Kynan’s mother, may be Dreaming quietly throughout her son’s quest, but her story is the catalyst for his journey and for a change that will change the face of Everdream and the Wake alike.

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In my new YA fantasy novel Everdream, in the middle of the land of Tyernas, on a hill overlooking a wide river, stands its capital—the home of the king, Castle Cairdrist.  Aside from the odd rare trip with his father, Cairdrist is the only place Kynan has ever known.

At first glance, Cairdrist looks much like any late medieval castle, but there are some important differences.

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dreamscape

In this sneak peek of my YA novel Everdream, Kynan learns a little more about the mechanics of the dream world.  As always, I’d love to hear what you think in the comments.

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In my upcoming YA Fantasy novel, accessing the magical realm of Everdream isn’t as simple as falling asleep.  There’s a bit of magic involved—a set of magic words…and a talisman.

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story-book-come-to-life

Have you ever read a book where you felt like you were actually living the story with the character? Have you read one where the character felt remote and lifeless? I can guarantee the reason for both is showing vs. telling.

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If you’re writing a novel, you need a setting. If you’re writing a fantasy novel, your setting needs to be an epic world. Whether you’re writing fantasy, historical fiction, or even something in your own backyard, you need to immerse the reader in that world without drowning them. There are a lot of novels that achieve this, and lots more that don’t. The ones that do work seem to follow these five guidelines:

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I’ve always been a daydreamer. More often than not, as a child, it got me into trouble. But the more I’ve thought about my wool-gathering habit as an adult, the more I realize that my greatest strengths rely on this sometimes misunderstood state of mind. Here are some ways I think we’ve got daydreaming wrong.

writing

Autumn has always felt like the true beginning of a new year for me, after years of back-to-school programming. So it follows that fall is a perfect time to start something new in my writing, especially with Nanowrimo coming up again in just over a month.
Now, you might be what they call a “Pantser” and enjoy seeing where your story takes you as you go. But even if you are the pantsiest pantser in the world, you still want to have some idea where your story is going. And if you’re a die-hard plotter, then you’ll really like these steps to creating a new plot.

Ever get to the place in your writing where you just want to play it safe? I think every writer gets there. Doesn’t every writer have a manuscript that’s too blah because you were too scared to go where you should have gone? Or a manuscript that’s gathering dust because you’re too scared for anyone to read it?

But staying in the safe zone stifles your writing. Risk brings your work to life. Here are some leaps of faith to take your writing to the next level.

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